Lean Six Sigma Project Types Diagram

It’s important to know what kind of Lean Six Sigma project you’re considering. These are 5 classic project types to help you decide. If you’re looking to conduct a Green Belt or a Black Belt project, then you should be working on a Process Improvement Project.

The focus here is on four kinds of “trees” or hierarchical diagrams that become part of many Six Sigma projects: Cause-and-effect diagrams Y-to-x flowdown diagrams Functional analysis diagrams Abstraction diagrams (KJ or affinity)

The focus here is on four kinds of “trees” or hierarchical diagrams that become part of many Six Sigma projects: Each of these trees has a specific thrust and strength that can be surprisingly challenging to capture when a project team tries to build one or more of them.

Lean Six Sigma Project Types Diagram diagram

Waste Iceberg Diagram

Loading… The Free Iceberg PowerPoint Diagram is a concept diagram slide for the success theory of achieving objectives. The template contains the iceberg illustration to present the performance and progress of an individual or the company.

The Iceberg PowerPoint template includes: 10 iceberg diagrams over various background layer stripes. We designed also a lighter version of outline iceberg that is more subtle illustration, in case you want your slides to be less eyecatching. This format is also better if you want to print the presentation.

Another case where the iceberg diagram can be used is product cost illustration. Manufacturing cost takes 15% of all expenditures, whilst project, research, tests and transport cost – another 85%. Another area where iceberg hidden levels of metaphor can be used is system thinking.

Waste Iceberg Diagram diagram

Kaizen Continuous Improvement Approach

What is Kaizen? Kaizen is an approach to creating continuous improvement based on the idea that small, ongoing positive changes can reap significant improvements. Typically, it is based on cooperation and commitment and stands in contrast to approaches that use radical or topdown changes to achieve transformation.

What is Continuous Improvement (Kaizen)? Kaizen is a Lean manufacturing tool that improves quality, productivity, safety, and workplace culture. Kaizen focuses on applying small, daily changes that result in major improvements over time. Kaizen first surfaced during the effort to rebuild Japan after World War II.

In all, the process suggests a humanized approach to workers and to increasing productivity: “The idea is to nurture the company’s people as much as it is to praise and encourage participation in kaizen activities.” Successful implementation requires “the participation of workers in the improvement.”

Kaizen Continuous Improvement Approach diagram

Seven Forms of Waste

When a facility produces too much of a product, it is a form of waste. Even if the product does eventually sell, it causes certain types of waste. For example, if you have too much of a product, it needs to be stored in a warehouse, which is wasting space.

When speaking about waste, lean experts usually refer to seven specifically. These include: transportation, inventory, motion, waiting, over processing, overproduction, and defects. Elimination of these seven kinds of waste can help companies reduce costs, increase employee engagement and customer happiness, and increase profits.

The waste of inventory involves storing products or materials that are not needed at this time. Excess inventory results in a waste of space, and it wastes the cost associated with the physical inventory. Although it is a significant concern in manufacturing, it occurs in other sectors as well.

Seven Forms of Waste diagram

Kaizen Design Principles

Please try again later. There are 5 Fundamental KAIZEN™ Principles that are embedded in every KAIZEN™ tool and in every KAIZEN™ behavior. The 5 principles are: Know your Customer, Let it Flow, Go to Gemba, Empower People and Be Transparent.

The kaizen methodology works at constant improvements through the elimination of waste. It’s been around in Japan since after World War II, though influenced by quality management ideas from the United States. It’s part of The Toyota Way, which is a set of principles that support the company’s management approach to production.

When used in the business sense and applied to the workplace, kaizen refers to activities that continuously improve all functions and involve all employees from the CEO to the assembly line workers. It also applies to processes, such as purchasing and logistics, that cross organisational boundaries into the supply chain.

Kaizen Design Principles diagram

Lean Supply Chain Management Diagram

Lean is an approach to supply chain management that originated with Toyota, which is why you may hear it referred to as the Toyota Production System (TPS). The idea behind Lean is that you use the least amount of time, effort, and resources by maintaining smooth and balanced flow in a supply chain.

Learning Points •Lean supply chain management represents a new way of thinking about supplier networks •Lean principles require cooperative supplier relationships while balancing cooperation and competition •Cooperation involves a spectrum of collaborative relationships & coordination mechanisms

This means creating new parts and paying for the labor associated with the repair, not to mention the inconvenience caused to the customer. Lean vs agile supply chain is really the difference in emphasis. Agile supply chain management focuses on the changing environment of business while lean supply chain is focused on quality control.

Lean Supply Chain Management Diagram diagram

Cycles of continious improvement

“5 on 5” The 5 Step Continuous Improvement Cycle 1 Identify the target process 2 Organize and empower an improvement team 3 Describe the issues, concerns or opportunity 4 Collect current performance data 5 Create a process map More …

The Continuous Process Improvement Model. Among the most widely used tools for the continuous improvement model is a fourstep quality assurance method—the plandocheckact (PDCA) cycle: Plan: Identify an opportunity and plan for change. Do: Implement the change on a small scale.

Updated November 18, 2019. A continuous improvement plan is a set of activities designed to bring gradual, ongoing improvement to products, services, or processes through constant review, measurement, and action. The Shewhart Cycle (also known as the Delming Cycle or PDCA, which stands for PlanDoCheckAct), or an approach called Kaizen, …

Cycles of continious improvement diagram

Value Stream Map

A value stream map is a visual tool that displays all critical steps in a specific process and quantifies easily the time and volume taken at each stage. Value stream maps show the flow of both materials and information as they progress through the process.

You of course want profitable applications of value stream mapping. It requires team members skilled in carrying out advanced VSM, and it may take days, weeks or even months to carry out some involved mapping projects. Think of it as a powerful tool central to lean methods, but not every circumstance lends itself to value stream mapping.

7 Steps to Value Stream Mapping Step #1: Decide How Far You Want to Go. Typically, you would start your mapping by indicating a start and end point. Step #2: Define the Steps. Now determine what processes are involved in order to get from point A to point B. As a… Step #3: Indicate the Information …

Value Stream Map diagram

Lean Business Agility Framework

Lean business agility is a framework that helps organizations operate in a manner that maximizes their efficiency and effectiveness. This lesson provides a highlevel overview of the things that characterize an agile organization. Imagine what it would be like to run a Fortune 500 company by making it up as you went along.

Business Agility 1 SAFe 5.0 – Your Operating System for Business Agility. … 2 Agile Product Delivery. … 3 Enterprise Solution Delivery. … 4 Lean Portfolio Management. … 5 Organizational Agility. … 6 Continuous Learning Culture. … 7 LeanAgile Leadership. … 8 Measure and Grow. … 9 Summary. … 10 Learn More. …

The road to real business agility is long and neverending. The SAFe Business Agility Assessment helps enterprises understand where they are on their journey and reminds them to celebrate the small successes along the way. It is built directly around the seven core competencies; each competency is further split into the three competency dimensions.

Lean Business Agility Framework diagram